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March 26 2015

jamesbros1919

What Walkie Talkie is the Best for Office Use?

It depends on what you want to use them for. A lot of two-way radios are designed with specific tasks/uses in mind, so it depends greatly on what you need them to do.

If your application is largely workplace-orientated, then a two-way business radio will likely work best. A good all-rounder, two way business radios (available from any manufacturer), can be used for increasing safety and security levels, relaying messages and services to clients quickly and efficiently, improving employee communication and much more besides.

In addition, modern radio systems are highly customizable, that way they can better suit your business needs. You can tailor them to your workforce, customer-base, or working environment. The following is taken from IcomUK.co.uk,

“Two-way business radio is a very flexible form of communication. It can provide simple one to one communication between a small group of users or increase the number of channels so you could have one channel for everyone, one channel for management, one channel for security, one channel for cleaning and so on. You can use each channel like an intercom system that lets you call individual people or groups instead of broadcasting a message to everyone. Some radios have scanning capability so your radios will only pick up conversation for the channels you have programmed. Dependent on your needs you can build a complex radio system integrating not just radio communication but security monitoring via GPS or CCTV or coverage between groups over a wide geographical area using the internet”.

Two-way radios are also exceptionally easy to use. Training your staff to use them takes almost no time at all and their user-friendliness is a great ‘plus point’ during emergency situations.

Two way radios are also far better suited for business use than mobile phones. This list is also taken from the Icom site.

business 2 way radioWhen you want to call someone on a mobile phone at a minimum you have to press a speed dial button and wait for connection. Between the dialing and the time delay of the person on the other end answering, some time can go by (if they answer at all). With a two-way radio you simply press a button and start talking. In an emergency situation, this speed could be critical.

You can talk to multiple users at once.

2wayradionline.co.uk provides radios with no monthly contract. You never have to worry about exceeding your allotted time like you would do with a mobile phone.

Icom radios are built to military specification which means that they will work in wet environment or even after they are dropped on concrete. Most mobile phone are not built to this standard.

Two way radios continue to work in natural disasters or major security incidents. Even if mobile phones do work, the mobile phone tower can get overloaded with everyone trying to make calls so your call may not go through.

Two way radios stay on site at the end of the day so can be used by shift or night workers.

There may be places in your business where mobile phones don’t work. Two way radios can reach all areas of your business, when repeaters are installed.

here (in this instance, at least). Depending on the size and scale of your business, it may be wise to hire a professional to help you set up your network.

March 15 2015

jamesbros1919

Gupta: Cell phones, brain tumors and a wired earpiece

Now then ladies and gentlemen, i have a different brilliant earpiece piece for you to read, i know, you do not need to thank me all, just click a social like to the short article to demonstrate your appreciation.

By Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Chief Medical Correspondent

Just about every time I use a cell phone, I plug in my wired earpiece first. Having discussed the use of earpieces on several news shows, people expect to see me using one. If I am walking around the CNN studios, my colleagues often comment on it. In airports, people will stop me in the rare cases I forget to use the earpiece, and remind me about it. Perhaps, they are intrigued because I am a neurosurgeon who openly shows some concern about cell phones.

Truth is, it is a pretty easy thing to do – using an earpiece. Furthermore, my neck doesn’t hurt after being on the phone for a long conference call, and given that many of those calls take place in a car, an earpiece becomes a requirement. Still, though, I don’t want to dodge the obvious question: Do cell phones cause brain cancer?

It may be too early to say for sure. The latency period or time between exposure and recognition of a tumor is around 20 years, sometimes longer. And, cell phone use in the U.S. has been popular for only around 15 years. Back in 1996, there were 34 million cell phone users. Today there are 9-10 times as many. Keeping that in mind, it is worth taking a more detailed look at the results of Interphone, a multinational study designed to try to answer this question.

The headline from this study was there was little or no evidence to show an association between cell phones and cancer. Though, if you went to the appendix of the study, which interestingly was available only online, you found something unsettling. The data showed people who used a cell phone 10 years or more doubled the risk of developing a glioma, a type of brain tumor. And, across the board – most of the studies that have shown an increased risk are from Scandinavia, a place where cell phones have been popular since the early 1990s. For these reasons, the whole issue of latency could become increasingly important.



Cell phones use non-ionizing radiation, which is very different from the ionizing radiation of X-rays, which everyone agrees are harmful. Non-ionizing radiation won’t strip electrons or bust up DNA. It’s more like very low power microwaves. Short term, these microwaves are likely harmless, but long term could be a different story. Anyway, who likes the idea of a microwave, even a low-powered one, next to their head all day?

And, what about kids? I have three of them, aged 5, 4 and 2. Fact is, they are more likely to lead to my early demise than cell phones. But, as hard as it is to believe sometimes, they actually have thinner skulls than adults, and will probably be using cell phones longer than I ever will.

The first person to encourage me to regularly wear an ear piece was Dr. Keith Black. He also is a neurosurgeon, and makes a living removing – you guessed it – brain tumors. Keith has long believed there is a link, and for some time, his was a lonely voice in this discussion. Nowadays, he has loud and prominent voices accompanying him. Ronald Herberman, director of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, sent a memo warning staffers to limit their cell phone use. One of the possible consequences, he says, is an increased risk of brain cancer. The city of San Francisco is trying to pass an ordinance requiring radiation warning labels on all cell phones. The European Environmental Agency has said cell phones could be as big a public health risk as smoking, asbestos and leaded gasoline. Even the makers of cell phones suggest you don’t place a device against your head, but rather advocate holding it 5/8 to a full inch away.

Many will roll their eyes at this, scoffing at the precautionary principle on display here. Fair enough. Still, I like my wired earpiece, and I don’t have to turn my life upside down to use it. I also text and email a lot more, because my kids rarely allow me to have a phone conversation. Speaking of kids, you will probably see mine using earpieces too, when my wife and I decide they are old enough to use one, which isn’t in the foreseeable future.

jamesbros1919

What is Ham Radio & How Does it Work?

Ham radio (so called because its operators were originally derided as being ‘hammy’ in the 19th century, when the technology first emerged) is a term that applies to any form of amateur radio broadcasting.

There are designated radio frequency spectra available solely for public use. Uses range from recreation to communication and the non-commercial exchange of ideas. ‘Hams’ take advantage of these frequencies in order to transmit any number of things

Strictly speaking, there should not be any money involved in amateur radio (hence the term ‘amateur’). Although themajority of Ham radio practitioners are actually extremely knowledgeable about radio technology (don’t let the ‘ham’ part fool you), they are not considered professionals because they do not profit from their endeavours. Conversely, commercial broadcasting involves (a lot of) money: royalties are paid, producers and performers are paid and the whole thing is ultimately a commercial exercise.

Hams use a large amount of frequency bands from all across the radio spectrum, but the majority of frequencies are to be found just above the AM band.



A lot of hams, however, use VHF FM, operating hand-held transceivers that send on one frequency and receive on another. Local radio clubs set up FM Repeaters (which borrow space from other broadcast devices such as towers and, in doing so, amplify the radio signal’s strength hundreds of times over), so that hams can communicate with each other wirelessly over a distance of hundreds of miles.

As an example of what hams get up to, here’s an excerpt from Gary Brown, of How Stuff Works.com

“Although a ham radio does broadcast in all directions, hams generally do not use their radios in a broadcast kind of way as a disk jockey would at a radio station. In normal AM or FM radio, one disk jockey transmits and thousands of people listen. Hams, on the other hand, conduct two-way conversations, often with another ham or with a group of hams in an informal roundtable. The roundtable of hams may be in the same town, county, state, country or continent or may consist of a mix of countries, depending on the frequency and the time of the day. Hams also participate in networks, often called nets, at predetermined times and frequencies to exchange third-party messages. In the case of disasters, hams exchange health and welfare information with other hams”.

To become a ham, I recommend that you join a club. You’ll need an amateur radio license, of course, but this won’t break the bank, I’m sure.

I hope that helps, Melissa.

Tags: Ham Radio

March 07 2015

jamesbros1919

POLICE CITE FAILURE TO COMMUNICATE

Police forces in several districts across Phnom Penh are reporting problems sending and receiving messages using their walkie-talkies, with noise and irritating sounds, such as dogs barking, appearing on channels used for normal communication.

Phnom PenhMin Sovanna, director of the radio communications department at the Ministry of Interior, said investigators are looking into the matter. He said that the current technology is out of date and may not be sufficiently secure.

About 20 years ago we installed the system for $2 million and it still is in use now. The old system now cannot be secure, but we lack money to upgrade to the digital system.

He believes that someone is using the same frequency numbers for the walkie-talkies and is tuning into them, though they may not be doing it with the express purpose of scrambling police communications.

Installing a better version could cost millions of dollars, he added, with each new walkie-talkie costing about $1,000 to $2,000.

Reang Putheara, a police official in Chamkarmon district's Boeung Keng Kang III, said the harassment really disturbs police work€. He has heard dogs barking on normal frequencies.

€This group, if they are arrested, we cannot forgive them.

Lieutenant General Kirt Chantharith, spokesman for the National Police, confirmed the problem, and said that while police have been unable to find the source of the attack, they are investigating.

€œSooner or later we will find them. They make harassment especially when we have big events.€ he said. Now police forces use the walkie-talkie by changing its code number to avoid harassment.

If, in fact, police communications are being intentionally disrupted, it comes during an upswing in attacks on government communications.

Since late April, authorities have arrested a total of four people believed to be members of Anonymous Cambodia, the local chapter of the global hacktivist group, and accused them of hacking into government websites. All four are in detention awaiting trial.

Anonymous Cambodia's Facebook page over the past week contains posts about taking certain government websites offline a€“ including the national police website€“ but does not mention involvement in the walkie-talkie harassment.

Want to find the original post have a look here
Tags: POLICE FAILURE

March 06 2015

jamesbros1919

WHAT BUSINESS 2 WAY RADIO IS THE BEST?

http://newsabouttechnology.co.uk/?p=138 If your application is largely workplace-orientated, then a two-way business radio will likely work best. A good all-rounder....

March 03 2015

jamesbros1919

Samsung Galaxy Note Simply Incredible

Samsung Galaxy Note 2 has visited the market for very long but still may some hidden tips that you could possibly not be aware information on. Also for those who are new to this gadget, they really need to figure out each time to get started with their newly acquired gadget. Here are some tips that absolutely apply for better user experience.

The 8-megapixel camera attached with the samsung galaxy s6 2 is a little feeble specifically in faint light fixture. Assume that inside photos are regarding the ordinary. Employing the camera outdoors, in good light, it is a different side of account. The snapper comes with some nice attributes like the burst shooting mode enabling the camera to take multiple rapid shots. Are generally mostly held in the phone's memory which later on you may be confused as to where to exactly discover their whereabouts.



As long as the ripping attempts are finished, 100 % possible click "Open" button to search out converted 1080p videos on Mac. To understand do next is just syncing and transferring movies to Galaxy Tab with Samsung Kies Mini and enjoying playing and watching Blu-ray movies on Galaxy Tab!

The internal storage space provided is 16GB such as the be surprised as you may simply be able to use 9.7GB storage. A major part of it is occupied with its software. Nonetheless, you can expand the memory to be a microSD slot is made available. If you think you are crammed for random access memory then you still need an additional option of Dropbox provides you 50GB cloud safe-keeping.

The Galaxy Note 8 comes in snow-white shiny chassis. The particular back-cover is shiny and that makes it a bit difficult maintain. But inspite of its size, it is very comfortable holding it and gliding your fingers with all the landscape strategy.

One thing that is interesting truth that eBay (gasp) tracks your purchases. Whenever login into the site at this link, any past eBay purchases can noted as part of your inventory. That is, of course, whether you would like them to be there or.

Data Storage: Many tablets hitting the actual marketplace have of storage space of upto 2GB & have expandable storage capacity of upto 4, 16, 32 & 64GB. Being highly capacitive, these tablets can carry data, songs, videos, movies while travelling long distances, going to college or even while preparing an exhibit. Most of the Android and Windows 7 tablets have an SD card slot for Eg. Sony 16GB Android Tablet.

It's been weeks since February 22nd (the last rumored release date for the Fascinate update) and features the familiar been 8 months combined with the release from the Galaxy S here in San Francisco and there is still no official word on an upgrade to Android 2.2.
Tags: samsung galaxy

February 12 2015

jamesbros1919

What Does Two Way Radio Mean?

A two way radio is one that can transmit and receive. It is also called a transceiver. The two way radio definition encompasses most of the wireless or cellular systems. Portable devices which use the two way radio system are called walkie talkies or handie-talkies. The transmitter on a two way radio device is turned on by pressing a push-to-talk button. Pushing this button sets you free to start talking through the device. There is normally another person on the other end of the conversation, or a group of people who have devices which use the two way radio system.

The 2 way radio technology is one of the earliest wireless network technologies. Despite the fact that there are countless other ways of wireless communication due to innovation, the two way radio system is still viable and used by people to widen their communication range.

It is mainly used due to the following two main advantaged:

Communication is Instant

The two way radio system enables instant communication. Within a fraction of a second after pushing the push-to-talk button, you would be able to pass on your messages . This has been made possible by a quick call set-up time integrated in this technology. The reliance of organizations on the two way radio system is founded on the fact that the device enables instant communication.

Group Communication is Possible With This Technology

This is a distinct feature of the two way radio technology. The capability of this system to create a scenario where a whole group communicates even from distances apart is also called “group call”. It is very efficient in that one caller is able to convey a message to up to thousands of other users at the same time. Not one user receives his/ her message later than the others in a group call. The conveyor of the message does not need to repeat himself/ herself so that the message is heard by everyone in the group communicating. Very little radio frequency channel resources are used during the group communication, meaning that it is not a way that utilizes so much of an organization’s resources.

Benefits of a Two Way Radio System of Communication

All wireless technology systems of communication have their advantages and disadvantages. Organizations or groups have their preferences in regards to how they conduct their day-to-day businesses.

A two way radio system of communication is superior to other systems of wireless communication due to the following key reasons:

• It is suitable for people who are mobile hence are rarely together to carry out their duties and responsibilities close to each other.

• It is suitable for communicating among a group of people.

• Communication using the two way radio system is instant.

The aspect of a two way radio system of instant communication enables emergencies to be handled pretty fast. A situation that requires urgent attention can be attended to as fast as possible. A cellular phone would be a great option for communication of emergencies, just that, they take time as the person on the other end of the call has got to receive first so that the message is conveyed. The few seconds or possibly even a minute as the phone rings could create an avenue for the situation to worsen. A two way radio system only requires you to push a button and then convey the message straight-up, as long as the radio frequency channels are available. In the event of congestion on the radio frequency channels, the two way radio system is designed to overcome this and create a priority in the event of an emergency. This feature is not available to other technologies of the wireless system.



Conclusion

What Does Two Way Radio Mean, The two way radio system is very efficient and economical. Making phonecalls to more than 5 members of a particular group would be pretty expensive as compared to conveying messages through a two way radio system. It would also take time to call one member after the other, a situation that would not arise with the two way radio technology.

Tags: Two Way Radio

January 08 2015

jamesbros1919

Channel 4 Buys Hitler’s Hair for £3000

British TV station Channel 4 is being strongly criticized after it authorized the purchase of a lock of hair that apparently once belonged to Adolf Hitler, for £3000.

The hair, which was acquired for DNA testing as part of the upcoming show ‘Dead Famous DNA’, was allegedly collected by the Dictator’s barber.

Channel 4 bought the hair from Nazi sympathizer and Holocaust denier David Irving. The controversial ‘historian’ also attempted to sell other Nazi memorabilia online in 2009.

Yahoo! News quoted Labour MP Ian Austin as saying that the sale represented a particularly uncouth publicity stunt. Austin said, “This sounds sick. It's appalling that Channel 4 would get involved with a Holocaust denier in some bizarre and tawdry show purporting to be entertainment (...) It’s disgusting, and raises questions about Channel 4’s public broadcasting remit.”

However, Channel 4 defended the move, with a spokesperson saying that “We believe the potential importance of the scientific and historical insight justified the purchase,”

Initially considered to be a respected academic, British author David Irving’s career as a historian gradually fell into decline as his works became more and more biased towards Hitler’s Third Reich. He has since spoken at various Neo Nazi rallies and has gone on record, a great many times, as both a Holocaust denier and a virulent anti-Semite. He has stated that he believes in a Jewish conspiracy to rule the world and has openly accused concentration camp survivors of lying about their experiences.

At the time of writing, Irving is banned from entering Germany, Austria, Italy, Australia and Canada.

According to The Jewish Chronicle Online, Mark Gardner, director of communications at the Community Security Trust, said, “It is distasteful to see Hitler being sensationalized in this way, but even worse that David Irving – of all people – ought to profit from it in this way.”

‘Dead Famous DNA’ is to be fronted by Mark Evans and will see the DNA testing of the remains of other famous figures from history. People like Charles Darwin, Marilyn Monroe and Napoleon Bonaparte. The programme will be broadcast later this week.

the source of this piece is Here
Tags: hitler's hair

January 07 2015

jamesbros1919

NASA Confirms Liquid Water on Saturn’s Moonell

A major scientific discovery was made this week as scientists uncovered overwhelming evidence indicating the presence of a ‘great lake’ on Saturn’s moon Enceladus. The discovery is important because it marks Enceladus as being a possible site for life existing outside of our own planet.

Initially, icy material was seen being squirted into space from an odd ‘striped’ pattern on the moon’s southern pole. It was theorized that this material was water being ejected from a large body of liquid H20 on the moon’s surface. This week, measurements from NASA’s Cassini probe revealed the water’s gravitational signal, effectively confirming the theory. The Cassini probe even sampled the water as it was ejected into space.

Professor Luciano Less, of the Sapienza University of Rome, who was interviewed on the subject by BBC news, said, "The measurements that we have done are consistent with the existence of a large water reservoir about the size (volume) of Lake Superior in North America,"

To add context to this statement, Lake Superior is the largest freshwater lake in the world by surface and the third largest in the world by volume. It reaches depths of 147 metres and has an approximate volume of 12,000 Km3. It also plays home to over 80 different species of fish.

Data extracted from the probe suggests that the water is about 40km underneath Enceladus’ icy surface.

Enceladus is locked in an eccentric orbit around its parent planet; this means that the moon’s orbit is non-circular and it therefore follows that Saturn’s gravity will have the effect of melting the ice in some places and freezing any liquid found in others.

There are a lot of places in our solar system that possibly house liquid water, but not as many where that water can come into contact with rock. Rock is important because rocks release minerals and salts into the water - and these materials are among the key building blocks of life.

Professor Andrew Coates of the UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory was also interviewed for BBC news, he remained positive regarding the possibility of microbal life on Enceladus. Prof Coates said, "I think Enceladus has gone to the top of the charts in terms of a place where there could be life. (...) It's got several of the things which you need for life - there's certainly the presence of heat, there's liquid water in this ocean, there's organics and that type of chemistry going on. (...) The only question is, has there been enough time for life to develop?"

However, as Professor David Stevenson, from the California Institute of Technology, pointed out “we don’t know whether the ocean is beinghere or is freezing up”. It is theoretically possible that the great body of water confirmed this week has been there for 100 million years, but it is also potentially a far more recent development. At present, no one knows for sure.

you can find more information from this place Here

December 30 2014

jamesbros1919

WW1-Era Shipwrecks To Receive Protection

July 28th 1914 was a day that changed the world forever.

A global war was declared that would last for four long, bloody years and would cost Humanity millions of lives. Although the images of the gruelling, inhuman trench warfare that was waged in France are the perhaps most indelible from the conflict, it should also be remembered that an awful amount of lives were also lost at sea.

Britain alone lost over a thousand vessels from 1914 – 1919, together with about 89,300 sailors and merchant navy personnel. Germany lost hundreds of warships, as well as about 35,000 sailors. In addition, civilians were also caught in the ocean-going crossfire, as a German submarine sank the liner Lusitania in 1915, killing almost 2000 people in the process.

As we approach the centenary of the First World War, the seafloors are littered with the stark, skeletal remains of vessels leftover from this conflict. In recent years, however, these ruined ships have come under an increased level of threat from salvage teams, looters and profiteers, many of whom are intent on destroying the wrecks outright.

Shipwrecks such as those left over from the First World War, are a target for two main reasons. Firstly, they can be commercially exploited for scrap metals (and other artefacts) and secondly, fishing trawlers dredging the ocean depths in search of deep-sea fish can impact the ships, destroying them altogether.

In 2011 alone, three British cruisers, the final resting place of about 1,500 sailors altogether, were completely destroyed because copper and bronze had reached sufficiently high prices as to make such destructive salvage exercises profitable.

However, because the 100th anniversary of World War One begins this year, more and more of these ships will be protected by Unesco’s 2001 ‘Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage’, an agreement that extends International protection toshipwrecks over 100 years old.

Many people worry that these laws will prove difficult to enforce, however. Others still are worried that this move will increase the destruction of shipwrecks from more recent times, in particular, vessels from World War Two (1939 – 1945), before they come under Unesco’s protection.

Today, historians are attempting to use the centenary of the First World War as a way to educate people about the history and legacy of the conflict, as well as to demonstrate the cultural and historical importance of these undersea war graves. Many, including this writer, feel that such sites are deserving of our respect and reverence.

Shipwrecks also provide a very good habitat for local marine life and can even form the basis for coral reefs (if left undisturbed for long enough). These vessels are also studied for scientific interest, with experiments carried out on everything from metal erosion to marine biology.

At the time of writing, the British Government has failed to sign the convention.

SOURCES

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28056244
Tags: ww1

December 29 2014

jamesbros1919

WW1-Era Shipwrecks To Receive Protection

July 28th 1914 was a day that changed the world forever.

A global war was declared that would last for four long, bloody years and would cost Humanity millions of lives. Although the images of the gruelling, inhuman trench warfare that was waged in France are the perhaps most indelible from the conflict, it should also be remembered that an awful amount of lives were also lost at sea.

Britain alone lost over a thousand vessels from 1914 – 1919, together with about 89,300 sailors and merchant navy personnel. Germany lost hundreds of warships, as well as about 35,000 sailors. In addition, civilians were also caught in the ocean-going crossfire, as a German submarine sank the liner Lusitania in 1915, killing almost 2000 people in the process.

As we approach the centenary of the First World War, the seafloors are littered with the stark, skeletal remains of vessels leftover from this conflict. In recent years, however, these ruined ships have come under an increased level of threat from salvage teams, looters and profiteers, many of whom are intent on destroying the wrecks outright.

Shipwrecks such as those left over from the First World War, are a target for two main reasons. Firstly, they can be commercially exploited for scrap metals (and other artefacts) and secondly, fishing trawlers dredging the ocean depths in search of deep-sea fish can impact the ships, destroying them altogether.

In 2011 alone, three British cruisers, the final resting place of about 1,500 sailors altogether, were completely destroyed because copper and bronze had reached sufficiently high prices as to make such destructive salvage exercises profitable.

However, because the 100th anniversary of World War One begins this year, more and more of these ships will be protected by Unesco’s 2001 ‘Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage’, an agreement that extends International protection toshipwrecks over 100 years old.

Many people worry that these laws will prove difficult to enforce, however. Others still are worried that this move will increase the destruction of shipwrecks from more recent times, in particular, vessels from World War Two (1939 – 1945), before they come under Unesco’s protection.

Today, historians are attempting to use the centenary of the First World War as a way to educate people about the history and legacy of the conflict, as well as to demonstrate the cultural and historical importance of these undersea war graves. Many, including this writer, feel that such sites are deserving of our respect and reverence.

Shipwrecks also provide a very good habitat for local marine life and can even form the basis for coral reefs (if left undisturbed for long enough). These vessels are also studied for scientific interest, with experiments carried out on everything from metal erosion to marine biology.

At the time of writing, the British Government has failed to sign the convention.

SOURCES

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28056244
Tags: ww1
jamesbros1919

WW1-Era Shipwrecks To Receive Protection

July 28th 1914 was a day that changed the world forever.

A global war was declared that would last for four long, bloody years and would cost Humanity millions of lives. Although the images of the gruelling, inhuman trench warfare that was waged in France are the perhaps most indelible from the conflict, it should also be remembered that an awful amount of lives were also lost at sea.

Britain alone lost over a thousand vessels from 1914 – 1919, together with about 89,300 sailors and merchant navy personnel. Germany lost hundreds of warships, as well as about 35,000 sailors. In addition, civilians were also caught in the ocean-going crossfire, as a German submarine sank the liner Lusitania in 1915, killing almost 2000 people in the process.

As we approach the centenary of the First World War, the seafloors are littered with the stark, skeletal remains of vessels leftover from this conflict. In recent years, however, these ruined ships have come under an increased level of threat from salvage teams, looters and profiteers, many of whom are intent on destroying the wrecks outright.

Shipwrecks such as those left over from the First World War, are a target for two main reasons. Firstly, they can be commercially exploited for scrap metals (and other artefacts) and secondly, fishing trawlers dredging the ocean depths in search of deep-sea fish can impact the ships, destroying them altogether.

In 2011 alone, three British cruisers, the final resting place of about 1,500 sailors altogether, were completely destroyed because copper and bronze had reached sufficiently high prices as to make such destructive salvage exercises profitable.

However, because the 100th anniversary of World War One begins this year, more and more of these ships will be protected by Unesco’s 2001 ‘Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage’, an agreement that extends International protection to shipwrecks over 100 years old.

Many people worry that these laws will prove difficult to enforce, however. Others still are worried that this move will increase the destruction of shipwrecks from more recent times, in particular, vessels from World War Two (1939 – 1945), before they come under Unesco’s protection.

Today, historians are attempting to use the centenary of the First World War as a way to educate people about the history and legacy of the conflict, as well as to demonstrate the cultural and historical importance of these undersea war graves. Many, including this writer, feel that such sites are deserving of our respect and reverence.

Shipwrecks also provide a very good habitat for local marine life and can even form the basis for coral reefs (if left undisturbed for long enough). These vessels are also studied for scientific interest, with experiments carried out on everything from metal erosion to marine biology.

At the time of writing, the British Government has failed to sign the convention.

SOURCES

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28056244
Tags: ww1

December 26 2014

jamesbros1919

WW1-Era Shipwrecks To Receive Protection

July 28th 1914 was a day that changed the world forever.

A global war was declared that would last for four long, bloody years and would cost Humanity millions of lives. Although the images of the gruelling, inhuman trench warfare that was waged in France are the perhaps most indelible from the conflict, it should also be remembered that an awful amount of lives were also lost at sea.

Britain alone lost over a thousand vessels from 1914 – 1919, together with about 89,300 sailors and merchant navy personnel. Germany lost hundreds of warships, as well as about 35,000 sailors. In addition, civilians were also caught in the ocean-going crossfire, as a German submarine sank the liner Lusitania in 1915, killing almost 2000 people in the process.

As we approach the centenary of the First World War, the seafloors are littered with the stark, skeletal remains of vessels leftover from this conflict. In recent years, however, these ruined ships have come under an increased level of threat from salvage teams, looters and profiteers, many of whom are intent on destroying the wrecks outright.



Shipwrecks such as those left over from the First World War, are a target for two main reasons. Firstly, they can be commercially exploited for scrap metals (and other artefacts) and secondly, fishing trawlers dredging the ocean depths in search of deep-sea fish can impact the ships, destroying them altogether.

In 2011 alone, three British cruisers, the final resting place of about 1,500 sailors altogether, were completely destroyed because copper and bronze had reached sufficiently high prices as to make such destructive salvage exercises profitable.

However, because the 100th anniversary of World War One begins this year, more and more of these ships will be protected by Unesco’s 2001 ‘Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage’, an agreement that extends International protection toshipwrecks over 100 years old.

Many people worry that these laws will prove difficult to enforce, however. Others still are worried that this move will increase the destruction of shipwrecks from more recent times, in particular, vessels from World War Two (1939 – 1945), before they come under Unesco’s protection.

Today, historians are attempting to use the centenary of the First World War as a way to educate people about the history and legacy of the conflict, as well as to demonstrate the cultural and historical importance of these undersea war graves. Many, including this writer, feel that such sites are deserving of our respect and reverence.

Shipwrecks also provide a very good habitat for local marine life and can even form the basis for coral reefs (if left undisturbed for long enough). These vessels are also studied for scientific interest, with experiments carried out on everything from metal erosion to marine biology.

At the time of writing, the British Government has failed to sign the convention.

SOURCES

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28056244

Tags: ww1

December 22 2014

jamesbros1919

HAVE YOU EVER THOUGHT HOW DO two WAY RADIOS WORK?

http://nortech-radiocomms.co.uk/?p=36 To put it simply, a two-way radio is a device that can both receive and transmit ......

December 19 2014

jamesbros1919

What Does Two Way Radio Mean?

http://tecommunications.com/what-does-two-way-radio-mean/ A two way radio is one that can transmit and receive. It is also called a transceiver. The two way radio definition encompasses most of.....
jamesbros1919

WW1-Era Shipwrecks To Receive Protection

July 28th 1914 was a day that changed the world forever.

A global war was declared that would last for four long, bloody years and would cost Humanity millions of lives. Although the images of the gruelling, inhuman trench warfare that was waged in France are the perhaps most indelible from the conflict, it should also be remembered that an awful amount of lives were also lost at sea.

Britain alone lost over a thousand vessels from 1914 – 1919, together with about 89,300 sailors and merchant navy personnel. Germany lost hundreds of warships, as well as about 35,000 sailors. In addition, civilians were also caught in the ocean-going crossfire, as a German submarine sank the liner Lusitania in 1915, killing almost 2000 people in the process.

As we approach the centenary of the First World War, the seafloors are littered with the stark, skeletal remains of vessels leftover from this conflict. In recent years, however, these ruined ships have come under an increased level of threat from salvage teams, looters and profiteers, many of whom are intent on destroying the wrecks outright.

Shipwrecks such as those left over from the First World War, are a target for two main reasons. Firstly, they can be commercially exploited for scrap metals (and other artefacts) and secondly, fishing trawlers dredging the ocean depths in search of deep-sea fish can impact the ships, destroying them altogether.

In 2011 alone, three British cruisers, the final resting place of about 1,500 sailors altogether, were completely destroyed because copper and bronze had reached sufficiently high prices as to make such destructive salvage exercises profitable.

However, because the 100th anniversary of World War One begins this year, more and more of these ships will be protected by Unesco’s 2001 ‘Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage’, an agreement that extends International protection to shipwrecks over 100 years old.

Many people worry that these laws will prove difficult to enforce, however. Others still are worried that this move will increase the destruction of shipwrecks from more recent times, in particular, vessels from World War Two (1939 – 1945), before they come under Unesco’s protection.



Today, historians are attempting to use the centenary of the First World War as a way to educate people about the history and legacy of the conflict, as well as to demonstrate the cultural and historical importance of these undersea war graves. Many, including this writer, feel that such sites are deserving of our respect and reverence.

Shipwrecks also provide a very good habitat for local marine life and can even form the basis for coral reefs (if left undisturbed for long enough). These vessels are also studied for scientific interest, with experiments carried out on everything from metal erosion to marine biology.

At the time of writing, the British Government has failed to sign the convention.

SOURCES

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28056244

Tags: ww1

December 17 2014

jamesbros1919

One of the earphones has stopped functioning, why?

There are many causes for the everyday (yet absurdly nauseating) happening. Generally, though, it’s simply due to that loose wire and can regularly be fixed by pushing the wire in the direction of the radio earpiece and, if needs be, fixing it into position with a small electrical tape, super glue, or other glue.

Now and again, if ever the earpieces have an inline volume turn, that may be the reason. That one is a bit trickier to mend, but you can always try the ‘wire trick’ described above and see if it works. If not, then open the volume controls and re-solder the wires into place (be warned, this will invalidate most warranties, so if ever the ‘phones remain covered, just send ‘em back and get replacements).

To avoid stuff like this happening in the future, it’s highly recommended to wrap your cables vigilantly and to avoid stressing your headphones. No, I do not mean you should give Motorhead a break and simply play floaty, soothing New-Agey music on them, I mean that you should not have them within your back pocket if you sit down and you must detach them carefully out of your ears after use (this will likely sound evident, but you’d be shocked how many people simply rip ‘em out).

Another thing to look out for is the jack, if the cable is fraying/wearing around the jack, then that can also be a problem. Fortunately, like so many things in life, a bit of electrical tape can really come in useful, just make sure that all the copper wiring is tightly bound and it should go back to normal usage in no time.

Now and then, however, it is simply an indication that the headphones are knackered and no amount of smart tinkering can repair them. Typically, in these cases, the issue is internal. This particular variant on the problem also attacks headphones of any price range, be they Poundland specials or your year old Sennheiser Eargasm headset. I am reminded of a Shakespeare quote from Hamlet, something about a king plus the guts of an beggar, but I can’t be bothered to look the whole thing up right now. You get the point I’m attempting to make though, everything dies eventually, no matter just how much it cost you.

the source of the piece is here
Tags: one earphone
jamesbros1919

WW1-Era Shipwrecks To Receive Protection

July 28th 1914 was a day that changed the world forever.

A global war was declared that would last for four long, bloody years and would cost Humanity millions of lives. Although the images of the gruelling, inhuman trench warfare that was waged in France are the perhaps most indelible from the conflict, it should also be remembered that an awful amount of lives were also lost at sea.

Britain alone lost over a thousand vessels from 1914 – 1919, together with about 89,300 sailors and merchant navy personnel. Germany lost hundreds of warships, as well as about 35,000 sailors. In addition, civilians were also caught in the ocean-going crossfire, as a German submarine sank the liner Lusitania in 1915, killing almost 2000 people in the process.

As we approach the centenary of the First World War, the seafloors are littered with the stark, skeletal remains of vessels leftover from this conflict. In recent years, however, these ruined ships have come under an increased level of threat from salvage teams, looters and profiteers, many of whom are intent on destroying the wrecks outright.

Shipwrecks such as those left over from the First World War, are a target for two main reasons. Firstly, they can be commercially exploited for scrap metals (and other artefacts) and secondly, fishing trawlers dredging the ocean depths in search of deep-sea fish can impact the ships, destroying them altogether.

In 2011 alone, three British cruisers, the final resting place of about 1,500 sailors altogether, were completely destroyed because copper and bronze had reached sufficiently high prices as to make such destructive salvage exercises profitable.

However, because the 100th anniversary of World War One begins this year, more and more of these ships will be protected by Unesco’s 2001 ‘Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage’, an agreement that extends International protection toshipwrecks over 100 years old.

Many people worry that these laws will prove difficult to enforce, however. Others still are worried that this move will increase the destruction of shipwrecks from more recent times, in particular, vessels from World War Two (1939 – 1945), before they come under Unesco’s protection.



Today, historians are attempting to use the centenary of the First World War as a way to educate people about the history and legacy of the conflict, as well as to demonstrate the cultural and historical importance of these undersea war graves. Many, including this writer, feel that such sites are deserving of our respect and reverence.

Shipwrecks also provide a very good habitat for local marine life and can even form the basis for coral reefs (if left undisturbed for long enough). These vessels are also studied for scientific interest, with experiments carried out on everything from metal erosion to marine biology.

At the time of writing, the British Government has failed to sign the convention.

SOURCES

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28056244

Tags: ww1

December 08 2014

jamesbros1919

Tech We’d love to to end up being able to See: Cities around the Moon

Placing a city (or several) on the moon has long been a dream of science fiction writers, futurists and ambitious scientists. Recently however, renewed public interest in space exploration, together with a growing realization that the world is becoming dangerously overpopulated, has lead some scientists, artists and zealous would-be lunar colonists to start taking this ages-old dream extremely seriously.

Why we want it:

Because it could potentially be one of the only non-genocidal solutions to the eventual overpopulation of planet earth. Also, who wouldn’t want to sit on the moon and watch the Earth rise?

When can we expect it?

A couple of years ago, a group called Moon Capital launched a high profile competition, allowing scientists, architects and aspiring artists the chance to create scientifically plausible scenes of moon colonisation (in the style made famous by super-artist Chesley Bonestell).

The competition had (hypothetical) moon colonisation taking place in the year 2068. This estimate was good enough for the entrants of the competition, so it’ll be good enough for us, too. Hopefully, then, you’ll get your lunar colony in about 55 years time (just under a hundred years after Neil Armstrong took that one small step....)

Of course, the problems posed by such a feat of engineering are many-fold. For starters, the moon is some 380,000 km away from us at any given time, (which is quite a trip for a moving van, even taking speed cameras out of the equation), then there’s the difficulty of actually building a working city in such a hostile environment...



We’ve built space stations, of course, so we know we can construct things in space, but they aren’t exactly desirable places to live. Also, we can get people to the moon and back (we’ve been at it since the 60’s, no matter what the conspiracy nuts tell you), but the trip is still intensely dangerous and requires a great deal of training and preparation.

Finally, we come to the complete lack of breathable atmosphere on the moon; this would require scientists to create some sort of artificial environment (or else speed up development of terraforming methods, but that’s a story for another time).

Oh yeah, there’s no food either, not unless you like your Selenite steaks rare.

Yes, the idea of colonising the moon poses a number of mind-boggling obstacles, but if there’s one thing that we as a species excel at, its overcoming obstacles.

So, while it may seem far-fetched to imagine something like this actually happening, consider this; the first powered flight took place in 1903 and just 66 years later, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were hanging out on the moon. Think on that for a second.

Cool Factor: 5/5

Cities on the moon? Now that’s cool.

you can find more info from this site here

Tags: moon city

December 03 2014

jamesbros1919

The Definition of High Quality TV: It’s Not TV, Its HD TV

It seems that everybody is using high definition television these days. It’s rare you see a house without one. So, if you’re still unsure about if HD TV is right for you, here are a few of the advantages of a Sony TV. I say Sony TV because Sony are currently among the world leaders in HD TV design and their models are usually cutting edge to the point of drawing blood.

Hi-Def television (HD TV to its friends) is preferable for its superior sound and picture quality, when combined with a Blu Ray player and surround sound; you can create a spectacular cinema-lite experience, with screens that seem to get nearly as big, too! Now, whilst I am personally an ardent fan of the cinema experience, there’s a lot to be said for inviting your friends over for a movie marathon complete with microwave popcorn, beer and as-and-when-needed bathroom breaks.



Another cool feature is the ease with which you can hook your Sony TV up to a laptop computer (the cable costs about £7), meaning you can watch DV, MP4 and Avi files at your leisure. HD TV is a great development in television and home technology in general. The option to attach a Sony TV directly to the wall is also a plus; it’s a real space-saver as well as looking very cool indeed.

With HD TV, every movie is a great big adventure. Big budget, special effects-laden movies fare particularly well in HD. My brother recently bought the remastered, all-singing, all dancing Star Trek boxset and they look great on our HD TV. Especially in the case of the newer ones with the CGI Enterprise, the meticulous design and attention-to-detail really shines through. Set design, mise en scene and subtlety are really rewarded with an HD TV.

Television is the focal point of the modern living room. In fact, television seems to be of increasing importance to the social fabric itself. Is ownership of an HD TV the latest status symbol? Probably not, but it can’t hurt to upgrade just in case.

the source of this piece is here

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